Biosecurity for Poultry Farms

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We are here to help protect the 300+ million tons of poultry meat and 1,500+ trillion eggs produced each year, globally

Challenges

In 2019, the world produced 337 million tons of poultry meat and and egg count exceeding 1,500 trillion (1,500,000,000,000) (source FAOSTAT).

Breeding houses, incubators and hatcheries, fattening farms, and processing plants, all face multiple biosecurity threats, especially from Salmonella, Typhlitis, and Aspergillus.

Formaldehyde and fumigation in breeding houses and fattening farms between flock cycles are only partially effective, toxic, and leave a chemical residue.

Eggshells are frequently coated with Salmonella and other pathogens from contact with reproductive systems and fecal matter, infecting hatchlings, causing suffering and reducing yield.

Meat processing plants must maintain high levels of sanitation at all stages, including, all the equipment and the chilled water used in fat extraction.

Biosecurity for Poultry Farms

Breeding and Fattening Farms

O3D2 is used between flock cycles to decontaminate all floors, both slatted and solid, walls and ceilings of the houses. Ozone gas also penetrates inaccessible locations like bundled cabling, ducts and drains. Unused ozone degrades into oxygen within hours, making it safe to resume operations.

Incubators and Hatcheries

Fertilized eggs are exposed to a carefully timed sequence of micro-doses of ozone and UVC light – enough to destroy pathogens without harming the live embryos. O3D2 continually monitors environmental parameters, using AI to determine when the harmful organic matter has been destroyed.

Processing Plants

Vast quantities of chilled water are used during meat processing, and there is a high risk of transferring pathogens between samples of meat. O3D2 uses electron ionization to inject O3 into the water to decontaminate it, before using UVC light to remove the ozone from the water prior to reuse. This keeps the water clean and fresh without harming the poultry meat.

Biosecurity for Poultry Farms

O3D2

O3D2 photo

Biosecurity

Biosecurity

FAQ

How does O3D2 use AI?

O3D2 uses AI to continuously sense the environment and make instant decisions that result in cleaner outcomes, in less time, without damaging the assets its trying to keep clean in a careful balancing act.

How does O3D2 produce ozone?

It uses high-voltage electron ionization to split diatomic oxygen into ions, which combine with O2 to produce triatomic oxygen, O3. The process is more efficient with drier input air, and even better when coupled with an oxygen concentrator.

What kind of UV light does O3D2 produce?

It produces high-energy UVC light, in the 254-280 nm range of wavelengths which is known to disinfect

How does ozone decontaminate?

Triatomic oxygen is a highly reactive gas. Each molecule readily oxidizes various elements of organic material. For example, it cause bacterial membranes to rupture, rendering them inert. For viruses, ozone causes peroxidation of the infected cells and also damages the viral capsid.

Which pathogens can O3D2 destroy?

Bacteria, viruses, fungi, mold and spores. Each pathogen reacts differently to ozone and UVC, meaning different concentrations and contact time.

Is ozone safe?

Yes, it is FDA approved for use in decontamination with OSHA guidelines for concentrations and exposure time, and 0.1 ppm is considered safe for humans. O3D2 constantly monitors the air to assess when it is safe to re-enter.

What happens to the unspent ozone?

It naturally degrades back into regular oxygen. This can take minutes to hours depending on many factors including whether it is airborne or dissolved in water, temperature and humidity. For safety, O3D2 measures the concentration of ozone until it is safe. Catalytic destructors accelerate the process.

What are some examples of recalls?

Dec 2020, 8,492,832 lbs of Tyson frozen ready-to-eat chicken products due to potential listeria contamination (link)

Mar 2019, 78,164 lbs of Butterball’s turkey products due to possible Salmonella Schwarzengrund contamination (link)

2011, 33 died, 147 infected in 29 states from cantaloupes that were “contaminated in the farm’s packing house because of dirty water on the floor” and that “packing and storage facilities” helped to spread the listeria from Aug to Oct 2011 (link)

More at FDA’s recall website and this summary site.

Challenges

Challenges

In 2019, the world produced 337 million tons of poultry meat and and egg count exceeding 1,500 trillion (1,500,000,000,000) (source FAOSTAT).

Breeding houses, incubators and hatcheries, fattening farms, and processing plants, all face multiple biosecurity threats, especially from Salmonella, Typhlitis, and Aspergillus.

Formaldehyde and fumigation in breeding houses and fattening farms between flock cycles are only partially effective, toxic, and leave a chemical residue.

Eggshells are frequently coated with Salmonella and other pathogens from contact with reproductive systems and fecal matter, infecting hatchlings, causing suffering and reducing yield.

Meat processing plants must maintain high levels of sanitation at all stages, including, all the equipment and the chilled water used in fat extraction.

Biosecurity for Poultry Farms
Solutions

Breeding and Fattening Farms

O3D2 is used between flock cycles to decontaminate all floors, both slatted and solid, walls and ceilings of the houses. Ozone gas also penetrates inaccessible locations like bundled cabling, ducts and drains. Unused ozone degrades into oxygen within hours, making it safe to resume operations.

Incubators and Hatcheries

Fertilized eggs are exposed to a carefully timed sequence of micro-doses of ozone and UVC light – enough to destroy pathogens without harming the live embryos. O3D2 continually monitors environmental parameters, using AI to determine when the harmful organic matter has been destroyed.

Processing Plants

Vast quantities of chilled water are used during meat processing, and there is a high risk of transferring pathogens between samples of meat. O3D2 uses electron ionization to inject O3 into the water to decontaminate it, before using UVC light to remove the ozone from the water prior to reuse. This keeps the water clean and fresh without harming the poultry meat.

Biosecurity for Poultry Farms
Resources

O3D2

O3D2 photo

Biosecurity

Biosecurity
FAQs

FAQ

How does O3D2 use AI?

O3D2 uses AI to continuously sense the environment and make instant decisions that result in cleaner outcomes, in less time, without damaging the assets its trying to keep clean in a careful balancing act.

How does O3D2 produce ozone?

It uses high-voltage electron ionization to split diatomic oxygen into ions, which combine with O2 to produce triatomic oxygen, O3. The process is more efficient with drier input air, and even better when coupled with an oxygen concentrator.

What kind of UV light does O3D2 produce?

It produces high-energy UVC light, in the 254-280 nm range of wavelengths which is known to disinfect

How does ozone decontaminate?

Triatomic oxygen is a highly reactive gas. Each molecule readily oxidizes various elements of organic material. For example, it cause bacterial membranes to rupture, rendering them inert. For viruses, ozone causes peroxidation of the infected cells and also damages the viral capsid.

Which pathogens can O3D2 destroy?

Bacteria, viruses, fungi, mold and spores. Each pathogen reacts differently to ozone and UVC, meaning different concentrations and contact time.

Is ozone safe?

Yes, it is FDA approved for use in decontamination with OSHA guidelines for concentrations and exposure time, and 0.1 ppm is considered safe for humans. O3D2 constantly monitors the air to assess when it is safe to re-enter.

What happens to the unspent ozone?

It naturally degrades back into regular oxygen. This can take minutes to hours depending on many factors including whether it is airborne or dissolved in water, temperature and humidity. For safety, O3D2 measures the concentration of ozone until it is safe. Catalytic destructors accelerate the process.

What are some examples of recalls?

Dec 2020, 8,492,832 lbs of Tyson frozen ready-to-eat chicken products due to potential listeria contamination (link)

Mar 2019, 78,164 lbs of Butterball’s turkey products due to possible Salmonella Schwarzengrund contamination (link)

2011, 33 died, 147 infected in 29 states from cantaloupes that were “contaminated in the farm’s packing house because of dirty water on the floor” and that “packing and storage facilities” helped to spread the listeria from Aug to Oct 2011 (link)

More at FDA’s recall website and this summary site.

Case Studies